Category Archives: Matsumoto Chieko

Matsumoto Chieko

Download Versus Full Movie | The Versus Movie

Genres: Action , Comedy , Fantasy
Actors: Tak Sakaguchi , Hideo Sakaki , Chieko Misaka , Kenji Matsuda , Yuichiro Arai , Minoru Matsumoto , Kazuhito Ohba , Takehiro Katayama , Ayumi Yoshihara , Shôichirô Masumoto , Toshiro Kamiaka , Yukihito Tanikado , Hoshimi Asai , Ryosuke Watabe , Motonari Komiya
Director: Ryûhei Kitamura
Country: Japan
Year: 2000
IMDB Rating: 6.5/10 (8968 votes)

Set in the present where a group of ruthless gangsters, an unknown woman and an escaped convict have met, unwittingly, in The Forest of Resurrection, the 444th portal to the other side. Their troubles start when those once killed and buried in the forest come back from the dead, with the assistance of the evil Sprit that has also come back, come back from ages past, to claim his prize. The final standoff between Light and Dark has never been so cunning, so brutal and so deadly. This is where old Japanese Samurai mysticism meets the new world of the gangster and the gun. Gruesome, bloody and positively bold.

Download Versus Full Movie | Download Versus Film Score

Genres: Action , Comedy , Fantasy
Actors: Tak Sakaguchi , Hideo Sakaki , Chieko Misaka , Kenji Matsuda , Yuichiro Arai , Minoru Matsumoto , Kazuhito Ohba , Takehiro Katayama , Ayumi Yoshihara , Shôichirô Masumoto , Toshiro Kamiaka , Yukihito Tanikado , Hoshimi Asai , Ryosuke Watabe , Motonari Komiya
Director: Ryûhei Kitamura
Country: Japan
Year: 2000
IMDB Rating: 6.5/10 (8948 votes)

Set in the present where a group of ruthless gangsters, an unknown woman and an escaped convict have met, unwittingly, in The Forest of Resurrection, the 444th portal to the other side. Their troubles start when those once killed and buried in the forest come back from the dead, with the assistance of the evil Sprit that has also come back, come back from ages past, to claim his prize. The final standoff between Light and Dark has never been so cunning, so brutal and so deadly. This is where old Japanese Samurai mysticism meets the new world of the gangster and the gun. Gruesome, bloody and positively bold.


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Download Versus Film Score

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Nihon Koi: 11. Bűnösök

/Egy évvel később/

- You can’t be me
I’m a Rock Star
I’m rhyming ont he top of a cop car
I’m a rebel and my .44 pops far.

Egy rockzenére táncolok végig a koleszben lévő lakosztályunk nappaliján, majd egy nőies mozdulattal vágom magam le a kanapéra, miközben még mindig a szöveget éneklem. Fujiko megjelenik mellettem, majd csapkodni kezd egy párnával. Egy ideig tűröm ezt, majd megelégelem.
- Abbahagynád, mielőtt agyonütsz a párnával? – vonom fel a szemöldököm. De még mindig csinálja, láthatólag a tény, hogy a fegyvere erőssége nem a legnagyobb nem téríti el attól a reménytől hogy unikornisos párna általi halált haljak.
- Ha nem kussolsz el most azonnal kihívom a rendőrséget – morogja. Egy év alatt sok minden történt. Reita megcsalta Fujit, Haru szakított Rukival, Uruha és Chieko hivatalosan is egy pár, nemsoká fél évesek. Aoi megkérte Mea kezét, Kai és Kim már össze is házasodtak. Én meg még mindig a magányos farkast játszom. Kezd elegem lenni. Rukival jó barátok lettünk, főleg miután Haru kijelentette, hogy ő márpedig túl jó az énekeshez, ezért menten szakít vele.
Nos, órák után vagy Shippuudent néztem Meával az oldalamon, vagy mélyen tisztelt Takanori-sannal róttam a várost, menekültünk rajongók előtt. Ez csak akkor volt szívás, ha magas sarkúban tipegtem végig az utcákon.
Most épp a Tenshi lányt várom, hogy kiszabaduljak az érzelmi roncs mellől, és élhessem az életem, mint egy fiatal huszonéves. Kopogtatnak, boldogan tépem fel az ajtót, majd kedvem elrohad, ahogy a theGazettE basszusgitárosát pillantom meg.
- EZ MEG MI A KIBASZOTT JÓ KURVA ÉLETET KERES ITT?! – ordítja el magát a Kobayashi. Itt bajok lesznek, pofonok és mérges szomszédok, szóval lelépek! Felkapom a topánkám, majd kioldalazva a fiú mellett, futni kezdek. Felhívom Meát, de lemondja a programot, – mert rájött hogy vizsgája lesz – kínos nevetések közepette. Jó, oké. Utána Rukit zargatom, aki röhögve mond igent az ajánlatomra, lelkendezve, hogy milyen oltári viccet hallott ma, és meg kell hallgatnom. Na, ez hülye.
Bő fél óra múlva fel is bukkan az énekes – jelenleg –  nagyon sötét barna buksija. Felém fut, majd nem sokkal előttem elesik egy kőben. Rám zuhan, szerencsére nem ütöm meg magam. Elpirult arccal lököm le magamról, ő szintén pirosan rejti a háta mögé bűnös kezét. Ez az idióta elvette a melleim szüzességét!!

Kibo – The Review? Part 1


Since the Winnipeg Free Press has their continued fascination (ass-kissing) with celebrities, giving washed up actor/wannabee rocker, Dennis Quaid yet more front page exposure in Sunday’s paper, of course they failed to mention anything about the Kibo concert. Not that I was really expecting much, but since the Free Press was one of their major corporate sponsors, I thought they might write a review or at least publish a photo from the show.

The audience was told before the show, “no photos will be allowed during the performance!”, so any quality pictures from the show will be rare and hard to come by (let me know if you have any good photos from the show, especially during the Brent/Geoff/Shayna song). I remembered to bring my camera, so I attempted to take as many photos as possible. After performing my piece with Shayna and Brent, I snuck up to the front row of the balcony and snapped away… sans flash, the result was some very blurry shots. The zoom on my camera doesn’t really have much zoom, so the least blurry shots are the more distant looking. Earlier in the day during dress rehearsal, I took the opportunity to take some closer-up photos as well as some casual candids. My regret is that I didn’t get any decent shots of the out of town performers, Kaoru Watanabe, Shoji Kameda and Chieko Kojima. All the other performers in the show had to make their way backstage for the finale piece, so I missed virtually all of their dance, drum and flute performance, I was told their piece was incredible, and I managed to get a glimpse of Chieko’s dance from the side of the stage.

Overall I think the show was a success, I’m not sure how much money was raised or how many seats were sold. The middle section on the floor was full, but the left and right sections were only full half way up, then there was several rows of empty seats, but the last couple of rows ($35 tickets) were occupied. The balcony was closed to the public, but many of the performers found their way up from backstage. Rumor has it the show was being video recorded (from the balcony beside the sound/lighting table) and may be distributed to the performers which I’m surely looking forward to.

There were many highlights, as previously mentioned Chieko, Shoji and Kaoru were great, Hinode Taiko were busy with their own numbers (including one I haven’t seen before, Stress, which even drew some laughs) as well as a collaboration with the Aurora Dancers on V.

The Aurora Dancers probably had the most stage time from beginning to end. The beauty of their pieces and the calm gentleness of their movements always finds a soft spot in my heart.

Musically, the show was solid, Michael Oike is truly gifted, a professional pianist who performed some Schumann as well as accompanying his niece, Alex Allen, who danced to a piece called, Hitori Botchi, Yuugata no uta.

Singer Shayna Paulicelli belted out First Love, a song in Japanese and English, she has an amazing voice and look for big things from her in the very near future (can we say Canadian Idol?). Shayna also joined Brent and myself for Okaasan no uta, which is a fairly haunting, yet quite lovely song. It was a pleasure to play guitar for these two talented singers, I think it sounded okay, except for when the sound cut out at the beginning of the guitar intro. I had accidentally pulled the cord out of the DI (direct input) box at the side of the stage when it snagged on one of the layers of curtains. Special thanks to Pam Okano for thinking of me for the guitar part.

An interesting element to the evening was the readings that members of the community gave in honor of a grandparent or relative. As Wayne Sato, Karleen Manchanda, Russell Kunz, and Kristen and Stacey Matsumoto each read their relative’s profile, images flashed behind them to give some insight and perspective to the audience. The use of the images on screen were most effective in the first piece of the night, Hajime ni (“in the beginning”)- “out of hardship and dislocation, a community is born and thrives. The roots of Manitoba’s Japanese-Canadian community are outlined in this multi-artist, multimedia creation developed for the concert” (as quoted from the program book).

The photos posted today are from the actual show (again I apologize for the blurriness), in the next posting I’ll display some group shots and some behind the scene rehearsal photos.

REVIEW: Funeral Parade of Roses


薔薇の葬列 (Bara no Sōretsu)

Released: 1969

Director:
Toshio Matsumoto

Starring:
Peter
Osamu Ogasawara
Chieko Kobayashi
Yoshio Tsuchiya
Emiko Azuma

Running time: 105 min.

Reviewed by Bob Turnbull

More than once during Toshio Matsumoto’s 1969 film “Funeral Parade Of Roses”, I wondered to myself if perhaps a good story had been ruined all in the name of “experimentation”. The random images, purposely vague actions, non-sequitors and repeated scenes all seemed to derail my investment in what I thought was the story. I never wondered for long though – even if what I just saw didn’t make perfect sense, within 5 minutes I always had a greater context that allowed me to not only dive back into the story, but to dive down a bit deeper. It’s a remarkable trick that Matsumoto pulls off – a fractured, non-linear set of events manages to create a complete picture of not only the central character, but also a community of people, a lifestyle and even an entire artistic movement.

The Shinjuku district of Tokyo was a thriving and culture rich environment in the late 60s and Matsumoto was right in the centre of it. He appears to have soaked up a great deal of what was going on through his early experimental short films because he wrings it all out in this feature debut. While revolving his story around young drag queen Eddie (played by 17 year old Peter – the jester Kyoami from Kurosawa’s “Ran”), Matsumoto also manages to ponder the nature of filmmaking itself by punctuating the proceedings with actual interviews with gay men (most of them “queens”) and providing several meta-moments that throw everything into question. Matsumoto himself appears in the film as a director of a love scene starring Eddie. When the camera cuts from the softly lit throes of ecstasy to the entire camera crew, Eddie asks into the lens if he is doing a good job in his first film (indeed, it was Peter’s first film as well). So was it actually cut footage from a similar love scene that opened the film or a fictional porn movie that the character Eddie was appearing in? Whatever the case, it adds yet one more layer to the confusion of the times for these young gay men – growing up in a very patriarchal society, but suddenly finding themselves with much more freedom to experiment with their own identity.

Identity and how we mask it is really the main theme of the film. This comes through in the very natural and honest answers of the men in the documentary-style interviews. The various types of responses help to give a better framework for Eddie and his friends as they flaunt being queens while they walk downtown, browse through shops and unapologetically march into men’s bathrooms. They aren’t much different than many of their friends who have their own masks and talk of political ideals while getting stoned and having orgies. One example is Guevera – an artist, filmmaker and self-proclaimed revolutionary, who can’t even keep on his own fake beard (that mimicks a much more famous revolutionary). There’s also Gonda, owner of the gay club called Genet (after author Jean Genet who wrote a great deal about the nature of homosexuality) and Eddie’s much older boyfriend, who has a skeleton or two in his closet.

The gist of the plot is that Gonda (played by Yoshio Tsuchiya who had his own Kurosawa connection in his very first film: “Seven Samurai”) is attempting to get his other boyfriend Leda to quit as the madam of his club to make way for Eddie. Meanwhile we see snippets of events that foreshadow tragedy on its way. Matsumoto further plays with our expectations, though, since some of these events have already occurred. Combined with the mosaic of almost subliminal images scattered through the film, you can never quite be sure where you are in the story. The many mirrors in the film reflect the many dual identities and help to always question what you might be seeing – is that the real person or yet another mask? As one of the characters says at one point, “Behind the masks, people suffer loneliness”. How ironic that one of the repeated musical cues in the film is the old child’s song with the refrain “The more we get together, the happier we’ll be!” It’s worth searching out this unheralded classic for the gorgeous and creative black and white photography alone, but there are so many additional interesting layers to peel away too.

Read more from Bob Turnbull at his blog.